Tesvolt Pulls Millions of Euros to Scale the World’s Longest-Lasting Lithium-Ion Battery

Tesvolt Pulls Millions of Euros to Scale the World’s Longest-Lasting Lithium-Ion Battery

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A German state-backed venture capital fund this week invested “several million euros” in Tesvolt, a startup that is claiming the world’s longest-lasting lithium-ion battery.

IBG Risikokapitalfonds III, a Sachsen-Anhalt state fund managed by Berlin-based venture capital investment house bmp Beteiligungsmanagement, announced the backing for Tesvolt after the three-year-old battery maker unveiled its new TS system this month.

“Tesvolt has developed an innovative storage system that features a new safety standard and a service life of 30 years,” noted bmp in a press release. “The IBG investments will go toward the further development of Tesvolt technology.” 

The cash injection will also help Tesvolt expand its production lines to meet predicted demand, as well as financing national and international marketing and sales activities, bmp said. 

Tesvolt’s TS system, designed for the commercial and industrial market, is due to go on sale at the close of the Intersolar Europe trade show in June this year. The company aims to shake up the lithium-ion battery market on several fronts.

Although it will come with a 10-year warranty, the system is mechanically designed to last for up to three decades, compared with 15 to 20 years for competing products. 

Tesvolt CTO and co-founder Simon Schandert told GTM this is important because for some applications, such as self-consumption, cycle rates might be as low as 250 cycles a year.

Since Tesvolt claims the TS can offer 6,000 cycles with 100 percent depth of discharge. This means the battery could in theory still be performing as new after a couple of decades of use, when other products might start to suffer from mechanical failure.  

The actual number of cycles covered by the warranty is 4,500 at 23ºC.

Outside this temperature range, the company will use a dynamic calculation process to offer warranty conditions for between -10ºC and 50ºC, “and not only between 18ºC and 28ºC,” Schandert said.

Tesvolt also claims a DC round-trip efficiency of 98 percent, with a warranted minimum of at least 85 percent after 10 years.

Schandert said Tesvolt could provide these warranty conditions by analyzing the state of each TS unit via data pulled from the battery management system and the inverter. The TS is being offered as a modular unit in sizes ranging from 15 kilowatt-hours up to 1 megawatt-hour.

For a “normal commercial system” of up to 50 kilowatt-hours, “we are nearly in the range of €600 to €700 [$650 to $760] per kilowatt-hour [of installed capacity] for the battery,” Schandert said.

Based on standard use, this would yield a cost of energy of around €0.10 to €0.12 ($0.11 to $0.13) per kilowatt-hour, he said. A 50-kilowatt-hour system could be installed within an hour, he claimed.

Tesvolt customers would have to buy an SMA Sunny Island or Sunny Central inverter (for low-voltage or high-voltage systems, respectively), on top of the battery system.

The all-in costs for an entry-level 15-kilowatt-hour system, including installation and a 4.6-kilowatt Sunny Island inverter, would be between €13,000 and €15,000 ($14,000 and $16,000), said Schandert.

This price could drop now that SMA has integrated its power measurement and energy management into a single Home Manager unit, he said. Even so, Schandert admitted the Tesvolt could not meet market leaders such as Tesla on upfront cost.

Nor is it trying to, he said. “We are not low-cost engineering. Our systems are a little bit more expensive than Tesla’s, but our cycle life is quite higher. When you compare all the technologies and costs, you will see the storage cost per kilowatt-hour for our system is lower than other solutions.”   

Like Tesla, Tesvolt gets its batteries from Samsung SDI. However, Tesvolt uses larger, prismatic cells that can be monitored individually and are equipped with safety features to prevent fire in the event of a puncture. 

Tesvolt also has a decent installation record for a company that only started shipping products in 2015. 

Last June, the company installed what it said was the world’s largest decentralized off-grid storage system, a 4-megawatt, 2.68-megawatt-hour project in Rwanda. And in November, it sealed a deal for 3 megawatt-hours of capacity in Mali.  

The backing from IBG will allow Tesvolt to build on this success, but Schandert said the company is not aiming for runaway growth or a stock market listing. “We want to grow very healthily,” he said. “We need capital for batteries but not for growing the company.”

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March 31, 2017 at 04:35PM

RMI releases report on rise of wind power for buyers in South West Power Pool

RMI releases report on rise of wind power for buyers in South West Power Pool

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Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) has released a report investigating trends around wind purchasing, transmission investments, and market growth for corporate PPAs in the South West Power Pool (SPP).

RMI tracks corporate transactions for renewable energy across the U.S. To date, the corporate market represents more than 7 GW of renewable energy.

The report, “Transmission Investments Affect the Value of Your Wind PPA” covers trends in corporate wind power purchase agreements for Central Plains states. It specifically highlights opportunities in the SPP.

“Thanks to low costs and improving technology, wind power has grown dramatically over the past 10 years across Texas and the Midwest,” said Anthony Teixeira, Senior Associate at RMI and author of the report.

“As grid operators have increased transmission investment and improved market structures, they are supercharging the market for wind power – to the benefit of corporate buyers who choose to transact in areas like SPP,” he added.

The report also shares key steps SPP took to unlock the economic opportunities of renewable energy and corporate energy deals, including upgrading of transmission infrastructure and improvement of electricity market structures.

From 2012 through 2014, SPP spent $819 million on transmission projects. SPP estimates this will create $16.6 billion of benefits over 40 years.

The creation of a new “Integrated Marketplace” has generated $131 million in net savings to customers in its first year of operation with the main improvement being the introduction of Day-Ahead Markets. This has helped to produce more efficient generation dispatch as it can be centrally optimised. It also has specific benefits for wind generators by reducing transmission congestion and curtailments.

RMI’s Business Renewables Centre (BRC) tracks corporate transactions for renewable energy across the United States and has seen steady market growth since 2012. To date, the corporate market represents more than 7 GW of renewable energy.

BRC is a member-based platform that streamlines and accelerates corporate purchasing of of-site, large-scale wind and solar energy. It has over 185 members, including major corporations, leading renewable energy project developers, and transaction intermediaries.

BRC members account for over 6.6 GW of renewable energy, and more than 95% of corporate renewables deals to date have included a BRC member. Its current aim is to help corporations procure 60 GW of renewable energy by 2025

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March 31, 2017 at 01:11PM

Vestas sets single-year record in 2016 & strengthens its grip on the top global position

Vestas sets single-year record in 2016 & strengthens its grip on the top global position

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Vestas won the top position in MAKE’s top 15 global rankings, according to MAKE’s Global Wind Turbine OEM 2016 Market Share analysis. The pure-play turbine OEM added 8.7 GW across 36 markets in 2016. The company has distanced itself from the runner-up, GE, by nearly three percentage points, the largest differential between the top two spots in the ranking since 2013.

Outside of China, western wind-turbine OEMs capitalized on markets with big years of new capacity, including the U.S., India, and Germany. Globally, Vestas ranked top place with 8.7 GW in 2016.

Western turbine OEMs accounted for four of the top five positions and seven positions overall in the top 15 global rankings. Outside of China, western turbine OEMs capitalized on markets with big years of new capacity, including the U.S., India, and Germany. Key differentiators for western turbine OEMs included market diversification and commercialization of larger-rated turbine models.

Performance in the offshore sector remained an important differentiator, particularly for Siemens, but it did not have the same overall impact as in 2015 since the global market size of additional annual offshore capacity dropped 32% YoY. However, Siemens accounted for 68% of global offshore capacity and Sewind’s offshore achievements in China helped bolster the Chinese OEM’s position in the regional rankings.

Vestas led all turbine OEMs in terms of geographic diversity with significant capacity added in each region. The top seven western turbine OEMs added capacity in an average of 21 markets in 2016, compared to an average of two markets apiece for Chinese turbine OEMs.

A lack of geographic diversity continues to expose Chinese turbine OEMs to fluctuations in the size of annual capacity additions in the China market. As a result of less new capacity installed in China YoY, the seven Chinese turbine OEMs in the top 15 global ranking added nearly 500 MW less capacity YoY. This kept six of the seven Chinese turbine OEMs from maintaining the same position or caused them to drop position in the ranking YoY.

CSIC Haizhuang was the only Chinese turbine OEM to improve its position YoY and incidentally was the only Chinese OEM to record more annual capacity in 2016 than in 2015.

Four markets globally had an over-sized impact on positioning within the ranking in 2016: China, the U.S., Germany, and India. Turbine OEMs in the top 15 that were unable to capitalize on growth in these markets experienced the most significant swings in percentage point changes YoY. Vestas posted the largest YoY change in market share percentage points (+2.9), followed by GE with +2.3 %-points.

Gamesa and Suzlon in India and Nordex Group and Enercon in Germany rounded out the leading turbine OEMs with more than a %-point change in share YoY. Of the Chinese turbine OEMs, only CSIC Haizhuang and Goldwind had a positive change YoY, with a 0.3 and a 0.2 %-point increase, respectively, in global market share.

Vestas claimed the top spot in the global ranking for consecutive years. Vestas also maintained the top spot in the cumulative ranking, with a 4%-point lead over GE, which came in second in the cumulative ranking. Vestas added capacity in 36 markets in 2016, 13 markets more than any other turbine OEM. Vestas captured the top spot exclusively with onshore growth.

GE returned to the second position globally after losing the spot to Goldwind last year. It held on to the top spot in the U.S., albeit by a thin margin, and continued to control the Brazilian market. In addition to winning the Americas region, GE posted record years in Germany and India and otherwise capitalized on demand for its 2-MW platform. It installed the first offshore turbines in the Americas market to complement its onshore focus.

Goldwind fell to the third position globally, with 7% less new capacity YoY, but had a tremendous year in China relative to its compatriots. It out-paced the next closest OEM in China by more than 4.5GW, as no other Chinese turbine OEM installed more than 2GW in 2016 compared to 6.4GW for Goldwind. It added modest capacity in the US as well as capacity in Pakistan and Thailand, but collectively, it installed less capacity overseas YoY, which did not help off-set a smaller market in China.

Gamesa jumped one position in 2016, beating its new associate, Siemens, for the fourth position in the global rankings. Remarkably, Gamesa won the second position in Asia Pacific, largely due to their leading position in India with 1.5GW added, as well as a big year in the China market. Although Gamesa continues to add less new capacity YoY in Europe, it has more than made up for the decline with success in the Americas, namely in Brazil, the US, Chile, and Mexico.

Siemens fell to the fifth spot globally in 2016, as it installed less new capacity onshore and offshore compared to 2015. Although it dominated the offshore sector, namely in Germany and the Netherlands, it added 30% less capacity onshore in 2016 than in 2015, as it was unable to capitalize on growth in the four main onshore markets. Its largest onshore markets included the US, Turkey, and the UK.

MAKE’s Top 10 global wind turbine OEM rankings are as follows:

  1. Vestas
  2. GE
  3. Goldwind
  4. Gamesa
  5. Siemens
  6. Enercon
  7. Nordex Group
  8. United Power
  9. Mingyang
  10. Envision

Windpower Engineering & Development

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March 31, 2017 at 12:20PM

Fraunhofer ISE’s New Research Lab for Power Electronics and Grid Technologies

Fraunhofer ISE’s New Research Lab for Power Electronics and Grid Technologies

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Power electronics and grid technologies are assuming a central role in an ever widening field of applications. Needed for both PV power plants and storage systems, they are also a main building block in electric mobility and micro grids

The post Fraunhofer ISE’s New Research Lab for Power Electronics and Grid Technologies appeared first on Solar Thermal Magazine.

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March 30, 2017 at 05:31PM

Perovskite technology steps forward with the guide of Dyesol, Panasonic, and Microquanta, but the stability question remains

Perovskite technology steps forward with the guide of Dyesol, Panasonic, and Microquanta, but the stability question remains

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ANALYST INSIGHT: Perovskites have reached two new milestones within the past weeks, showing the technology’s continued prospects to emerge as a commercial product. Solliance – the Europe-based manufacturing consortium – has demonstrated a…

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March 30, 2017 at 05:07PM

New report shines light on installed costs and deployment barriers for residential solar PV with energy storage

New report shines light on installed costs and deployment barriers for residential solar PV with energy storage

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Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are making available the most detailed component and system-level cost breakdowns to date for residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems equipped with energy storage systems – and quantifying previously unknown soft costs for the first time.

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March 29, 2017 at 04:28AM

Toshiba Projects Record Loss as Nuclear Unit Files for Bankruptcy

Toshiba Projects Record Loss as Nuclear Unit Files for Bankruptcy

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Toshiba Corp. projected its annual loss could more than double to a record 1.01 trillion yen ($9.1 billion) as its U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse Electric filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The collapse of Westinghouse, once the linchpin of Toshiba’s plans to diversify away from consumer electronics, caps a disastrous run for the Japanese conglomerate as […]

The post Toshiba Projects Record Loss as Nuclear Unit Files for Bankruptcy appeared first on Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

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March 29, 2017 at 03:33AM